Through the CALGreen Code, DSA requires sustainable practices that reduce the negative impact on the environment or provide a positive environmental impact.  These design requirements target measures to increase energy efficiency, water efficiency, water conservation, material conservation, resource efficiency, and environmental quality.

We have a Water Conservation at School Facilities information graphic for use as a water conservation resource for schools and community colleges to share with students, staff, landscapers, and janitorial crews.

To learn about DSA's the other plan review disciplines, visit the following resource webpages:

To continue learning about DSA plan review and oversight, visit the following webpages:

Energy Efficiency Regulations & Plan Review for School Construction

All Projects submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for plan review, including Relocatable modular buildings, must comply with DSA and California Energy Commission (CEC) requirements.

The California Energy Commission adopted the 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards on January 19, 2016, and the California Building Standards Commission approved the standards for publication. The effective date is January 1, 2017. The Division of the State Architect will be reviewing all applications for compliance to these standards. Applications for Pre-Checked designs for permanent or relocatable modular buildings submitted on or after July 1, 2017 need to meet these 2016 Standards. Refer to 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards and related notices and publications at www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2016standards/.

For DSA Submittal Requirements:

All site built projects are required to submit one or both of the following forms:

All Pre-Checked designs for permanent or relocatable modular buildings projects are required to submit the following form:

For Pre-Check Submittals:

For any questions regarding the California Energy Code, please call California Energy Commission’s (CEC) hotline at (916) 654-5106 or (800) 772-3300. You can also email CEC with your inquiry at title24@energy.ca.gov.

Proposition 39 Project Review Implementation Procedures

The approval of Proposition 39 by the voters of the State of California will have significant effect on the energy efficiency of schools and community colleges throughout the state over the next five years. The directive of the proposition is to improve the efficiency of buildings such that money is spent on education rather than energy usage, as well as to create jobs. Funding available should approach a total of $2.5 billion dollars over 5 years, at an average of $500 million per year. The implementation of Proposition 39 is authorized and will be carried out in accordance with Senate Bill 73 (SB 73).

The Division of the State Architect (DSA) has worked with the California Energy Commission (CEC) staff, who are the lead in developing guidelines for the overall program. We have examined and identified likely energy efficiency improvement projects that may be exempt from review by DSA, per statute and/or regulation. We have attached tables that list and describe these Exemptions/Exceptions. Projects which do not qualify for these exemptions/exceptions could likely trigger accessibility and structural upgrades. SB 73 is mute on these potential additional non-energy expenditures; however, any additional costs incurred by these triggers may have to be funded by other non-Proposition 39 sources, such as local bond funds. Some smaller school districts may not have additional sources of funding, so it is critical that they have a clear understanding of what work they can do with Proposition 39 funding without triggering the need for other moneys.

It is the intent of DSA to implement energy-efficiency improvement projects as cost-effectively and expeditiously as possible. Therefore, we have developed a procedure by which an applicant may request and receive an over-the-counter (OTC) review to confirm/acknowledge that a project does in fact comply with the Exemptions/Exceptions in statute and regulations, and does not need formal submittal/review and approval from DSA. A flat Fee of $400 will be charged for this process.

To initiate this procedure, please follow these steps:

  • Read PR 14-02: Exempt Concurrence (PDF)
  • Download and complete form DSA 7: Application for Concurrence: Project is Exempt (PDF)
  • Submit plans and the form DSA 7 electronically to DSA.
  • Bring check for $400 to appointment.
  • If project complies with DSA Exemptions/Exceptions, DSA will issue a signed DSA Review Acknowledgment and place in Proposition 39 DSAbox with plans.
  • If minor items need to be excluded from the scope of work to avoid any above-mentioned triggers, said changes can be noted on the plans electronically at the OTC appointment, using BlueBeam software loaded on the DSA computer used for review.
  • At the completion of construction, any of these Exempt projects will need to have form DSA 999: Inspection Verified Report for Projects Exempt from DSA Approval submitted by the Project Inspector.

    NOTE: The above procedure will be completed outside of eTracker; these projects will not receive an ‘A#’.
  • If a project does need minor Structural, Fire/Life Safety or Access review, it may still be possible to do so through an OTC appointment. Said minor review and corrections must be able to be completed within a two-hour time period. Prior to setting an OTC appointment for this level of review, an applicant will need to submit the proposed project to the DSA Proposition 39 Plan Reviewer to confirm that the scope of work can be completed within two hours.

    Projects expedited through this OTC procedure will be issued an ‘A#’ and be entered into eTracker. Upon approval, they will be issued an Inspection Card and proceed as a normal DSA project through construction.

For additional information, please refer to:   

California Clean Energy Jobs Act

This page is dedicated to resources and guidelines for those considering energy efficiency projects funded by Proposition 39, Clean Energy Jobs Act, at California school and community college campuses.

The Division of the State Architect provides plan review and construction oversight for K–12 schools and community colleges in California.

For any questions related to DSA plan review for compliance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, refer to the Regions Map on the Contact information page.

Projects Requiring DSA Review

Structural and Fire & Life Safety Requirements

The Division of the State Architect (DSA) Structural Safety (SS) and Fire and Life Safety (FLS) review and approval is required for alterations or additions made to existing public school building construction for compliance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, except under certain conditions indicated in California Administrative Code (CAC) Sections 4-308 and 4-309(a) and further clarified in IR A-10: Alteration and Reconstruction Projects - DSA Approval Exemption (see DSA Forms webpage).

For example, DSA review and approval is not required for alteration or reconstruction projects:

  • With an estimated construction cost of $100,000, or less, for 2016 and 2017; or
  • With an estimated construction cost greater than $100,000, but not in excess of $225,000, for 2016 and 2017, when certain conditions are met.

Certain energy efficiency projects may be exempted from DSA SS and FLS review and approval. The following table lists potential project types and the related DSA requirements for review and approval of SS and FLS.

 


Table 1: DSA Requirements for Structural (SS), and Fire & Life Safety (FLS)

No.

Project Type

DSA SS & FLS Review and Approval:
Required?[1]

DSA SS & FLS Review and Approval:
Notes/References

1

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning

No

HVAC unit replacement in kind limited to units of equal or lesser weight, in the same location, and no structural framing is altered.

2

Reroofing with “cool” roof

No

Roof covering replacement and insulation limited to weight of existing roof covering and insulation.

3

Weatherization/caulking

No

 

4a

Window replacement (glazing only)

No

 

4b

Window replacement (frames and glazing)

Yes

DSA approval not required if entire window replacement project cost is $39,324.38 or less per DSA IR A-10.

5a

Window shading devices—window screens (applied to glazing)

No

 

5b

Window shading devices—solar shading devices requiring structural attachment

Yes

DSA approval not required if entire window shade structure project cost is $39,324.38 or less per DSA IR A-10.

6

Energy Management Systems (EMS)

No

 

7

Lighting upgrades—re-lamping, ballast replacements, fixture replacement

No

 

8

Water-heating upgrades

No

 

9

Skylights

Yes

DSA approval not required if entire skylight project cost is $39,324.38 or less and no structural framing is altered. 

Table 1 Footnotes:

1. Exempted projects must comply with all currently effective design, construction, and inspection provisions contained in Title 24 as adopted by DSA-SS and SFM. Refer to DSA IR A-10, Section 3.

Additionally, the CAC Section 4-309(c) requires a structural rehabilitation to existing school buildings when any of the following conditions occur:

  • The alteration project cost exceeds 50 percent of building replacement value (excluding certain maintenance work and air-conditioning equipment and voluntary seismic strengthening work).
  • The building seismic mass in any story is increased by more than 10 percent.
  • The building seismic load capacity of any component is reduced by more than 5 percent.
  • The risk category is changed to an occupancy that results in the structure being reclassified to a higher risk category.

Accessibility Requirements

The DSA must review and approve public school construction for compliance with accessibility standards given in the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, Part 2 (CBC), Chapter 11B when alterations or additions are made to existing buildings. If the existing “path of travel” elements do not comply with current code provisions, upgrades are required to the area of the work and designated elements serving the altered area. Upgrades to the current “path of travel” are required as follows:

  • If the cost of the project is below $143,303, then the cost of compliance is limited to 20 percent of the adjusted construction cost.
  • If the cost is $143,303 or higher, there is no limit to the cost of compliance unless the enforcing agency determines the cost of compliance is an unreasonable hardship.
  • If unreasonable hardship is determined, there must be compliance by equivalent facilitation or to the greatest extent possible. However, the cost of compliance shall not be less than 20 percent of the adjusted construction cost.

Under the current CBC accessibility provisions, certain energy conservation and efficiency projects may or may not trigger accessibility upgrades outside the area of the project work. The following table lists potential project types and the related requirements for accessibility upgrades.

 


Table 2: DSA Requirements for Accessibility Upgrades

No.

Project Type

Path of Travel Access Upgrades:
Required?

Path of Travel Access Upgrades:
Applicable 2013 Code Sections

1

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning

No[2]

11B-202.4 Exceptions: 7

2

Reroofing with “cool” roof

No[2]

11B-202.4 Exceptions: 7

3

Weatherization/caulking

No[3]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4
Exceptions: 7

4a

Window replacement (glazing only)

No[3]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4
Exceptions: 7

4b

Window replacement (frames and glazing)

Yes[4]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4

5a

Window shading devices—window screens (applied to glazing)

No[5]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4

5b

Window shading devices—solar shading devices requiring structural attachment

Yes[6]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4

6

Energy Management Systems (EMS)

No[7]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4
Exceptions: 7

7

Lighting upgrades—re-lamping, ballast replacements, fixture replacement

No[8]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4
Exceptions: 7

8

Water-heating upgrades

No[9]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4
Exceptions: 7

9

Skylights

Yes[10]

2-202 Definitions
“Alterations” and 11B-202.4

Table 2 Footnotes:

2. 11B-202.4 Path of Travel Requirements in Alterations, Additions and Structural Repairs. When alterations or additions are made to existing buildings...Exceptions:7. Projects consisting only of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, reroofing, electrical work not involving placement of switches and receptacles, cosmetic work that does not affect items regulated by this code, such as painting, equipment not considered to be a part of the architecture of the building or area, such as computer terminals and office equipment shall not be required to comply with 11B-202.4 unless they affect the usability of the building or facility.

3. ALTERATION [DSA-AC] A change, addition or modification in construction, change in occupancy or use, or structural repair to an existing building or facility. Alterations include, but are not limited to, remodeling, renovation, rehabilitation, reconstruction, historic restoration, resurfacing of circulation paths or vehicular ways, changes or rearrangement of the structural parts or elements, and changes or rearrangement in the plan configuration of walls and full-height partitions. Normal maintenance, reroofing, painting or wallpapering, or changes to mechanical and electrical systems are not alterations unless they affect the usability of the building or facility.

4. Replacement of glazing units is considered normal maintenance of the glazing system that does not affect the “usability of the building” and therefore would not qualify as alterations under 11B-202.4.

5. Replacement of screens is considered normal maintenance of a glazing sub-system that does not affect the “usability of the building” and therefore would not qualify as alterations under 11B-202.4.

6. The addition of fixed and operable solar shading devices, such as horizontal sun shades or vertical fins that require structural connections to the building or ground, is a “A change, addition or modification in construction” and would qualify as alterations under 11B-202.4.

7. The addition of an Energy Management System would be a “change to an electrical or mechanical system” and not considered an alteration for purposes of accessibility under 11B-202.4. See note 4 above.

8. Lighting Upgrades—re-lamping, ballast replacements, fixture replacement—are “electrical work not involving placement of switches and receptacles.” See note 3 above. By definition, these upgrades are also “changes to mechanical and electrical systems” that would not qualify as alterations for purposes of accessibility upgrades under 11B-202.4.

9. Upgrades to water heating systems are considered “changes to mechanical and electrical systems” and not alterations for purposes of accessibility upgrades. See note 5 above.

10. The addition of skylights or solar tubes in the roof of an existing building would be “A change, addition or modification in construction” and qualifies as an Alteration. See note 5 above.

Plan Review Options

DSA offers accelerated and conventional plan reviewing for Proposition 39 projects depending on the complexity of the alteration project. See the DSA Proposition 39 Process Diagram showing the DSA process set up specifically for Proposition 39 projects.

  • Expedited review
  • Traditional review

Construction Oversight

After the construction documents are approved, DSA is notified by the design professional of the start of construction. DSA then reviews and approves the qualifications of the proposed project inspector(s). Visit the Start Construction Project by Submitting Plans for Review webpage for more information.

Note that Proposition 39 projects exempt from DSA plan review and approval will not receive construction oversight by DSA; however, a project inspector is still required to be hired by the school district.

Technical Guides

  • DSA IR A-4.13: GeoHazard Report Requirements: 2013 & 2016 CBC (See DSA Forms webpage)
  • DSA IR 16-8: Solar Photovoltaic and Thermal Systems Review and Approval Requirements (See DSA Forms webpage)

Useful Links

 

Photovoltaic Installations

This page is dedicated to resources and guidelines for those considering photovoltaic (PV) installations on California school and community college campuses.

The Division of the State Architect (DSA) oversees construction projects on California K–12 schools and community colleges by providing plan review and approval, and construction oversight of projects, in response to applications from California school and community college districts.

Projects Requiring DSA Review (Examples)

  • New construction including ground mounted solar installations in parking areas, canopies and shade structures.
  • New building construction involving solar panels on roofs.
  • Structural alterations including solar installations on existing building roofs.

For more information refer to Start Construction Project by Submitting Plans for Review.

Projects Excluded or Exempt from DSA Review (Examples)

  • Excluded projects: fenced off ground mounted photovoltaic installations (see IR 16-8, Section 5 for more information).
  • Alteration projects, including solar installations on existing building roofs, with estimated construction cost below a specified amount (see IR A-10 for more information).

Expedited Review

Traditional Review

Construction Oversight

After the plans are approved, DSA is notified by the design professional or proposed inspector of the start of construction. DSA reviews the qualifications of and approves the proposed project inspector(s) who will inspect the construction. See the "Construction Oversight" section on the Construction-Projects page for more information.

For any questions related to the plan review and construction oversight of PV projects, contact the DSA Regional Office with jurisdiction over the county in which the school/community college district is located.

Technical Guidelines
  • Geological Hazard Report Requirements: IR A-4: Geohazard Report Requirements: 2007 and 2010, DSA IR A-4.13
  • Solar Photovoltaic and Thermal Systems Review and Approval Requirements: DSA IR 16-8: Solar Photovoltaic and Thermal Systems Systems Review and Approval Requirements (PDF) 
  • Pre-Check (PC) Approval Process for Solar Design: See Section 5 of DSA PR 07-01: Pre-Check Approval (PDF) Revised 12/20/17
  • Accessiblity Requirements for Solar Photovoltaic Systems at School Sites: IR 11B-9: Accessibility Requirements for Solar Photovoltaic Systems at School Site - 2013 CBC

Useful Links

Going Grid Neutral at California Schools - December 2008

On December 9, 2008, the State and Consumer Services Agency announced the release of California's "grid neutral" guidebook, a step-by-step guide to help California schools and community colleges cut energy costs through on-site electricity generation. The program was spearheaded by the California State Architect and a team of environmental experts. It is the first comprehensive program for schools to use to create campuses that generate as much electrical energy as they consume in a year.

Grid Neutral Schools Guidebook   

Grid Neutral Awards and Press

California announced the Inaugural 2010 Grid Neutral Schools Awards at the Green California Summit on December 10, 2010 in Pasadena. See links to press release, presentation and additional Grid Neutral press provided below.

Riverbend's Energy Efficiency Earns State Honor

In 2010 ‘Riverbend received the top honor among public schools and school districts in the state as the first Grid Neutral Distinguished Campus. Steve Plaxco, director of maintenance and facilities for Yuba City Unified School District, could not be more proud of the state award.'

Green Code - April 2010

DSA has now included grid neutral in the voluntary measures of the new Green Code, Title 24, Part 11, the first statewide green building code in the nation. For more information, visit the California Building Standards Commission website. The 2010 California Green Building Standards Code Application Matrix is a quick reference to the provisions in the green code adopted by DSA.

Zero Net Energy - September 2012

The next bold step beyond Grid Neutral is Zero Net Energy (ZNE). At the September 2012 Green California Schools/Community Colleges Summit, the DSA along with Lisa Gelfand (DSA Advisory Board Green Committee member) presented an educational session titled: “Moving from A to Z(ero) Net” to introduce the concept of ZNE and provide easy, immediate actions for lowering energy in educational facilities. The DSA is encouraging schools and community colleges to start planning their facilities to meet the California Strategic Plan. The goal set is that all new commercial buildings and half of all existing commercial buildings achieve Zero Net Energy (ZNE) by 2030.

Governor Brown issued State of Emergency proclamations for the continued statewide drought in January and April of 2014. In support of the governor’s initiatives, the Division of the State Architect (DSA) proposed regulations in the 2013 California Green Building Standards Code (also known as the CALGreen Code) to reduce outdoor water use for landscape irrigation by public schools and community colleges.

The DSA regulations were approved on an emergency basis by the Building Standards Commission on July 21, 2015, and are based upon the Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO) regulations adopted by the Department of Water Resources. Effective January 1, 2016, applications received by DSA are subject to the Outdoor Water Use regulations.

All projects with new irrigated landscape areas over 500 square feet in the scope of work, and projects at existing sites with rehabilitated landscape work over 1,200 square feet, need to be submitted to DSA for verification of compliance through a self-certification process. The self-certification is a one-step process with the initial submittal to DSA.

Additional requirements for existing campuses apply when a new building or an addition to an existing building is constructed. This requirement is related to the “footprint” size of the building or addition and calls for the rehabilitation of a specified square foot area of existing landscape areas based on the size of the building addition. The intent is to rehabilitate areas on campuses to optimize water efficiency or reduce unnecessary landscape area. Use of gray-water and recycled water is encouraged by the Department of Water Resources. Special landscapes, like playing fields, are given higher irrigation adjustment factors to maintain use in educational programs.

Refer to DSA Procedure PR 15-03: Compliance with CALGreen Code Outdoor Water Use Regulations for detailed information.

1. When is the DSA 1-L: Title 24, Part 11 – Outdoor Water Use Self-Certification of Landscape Irrigation Design and Documentation form required?

All projects containing irrigated landscape improvements or modifications to existing landscape irrigation are required to comply with the Outdoor Water Use Regulations of Title 24, Part 11 (CALGreen), which are based on the mandatory Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO) in Chapter 2.7, Division 2, Title 23, California Code of Regulations.

Projects are required to be submitted to DSA if the project cost is over the threshold that requires project submission to DSA. Refer to DSA publications IR A-10: Alteration and Reconstruction Projects - DSA Approval Exemption and IR A-22: Construction Projects and Items Exempt from DSA Review for information on these project cost thresholds.

2. Do I need to submit a DSA 1-L if the project’s scope of landscape work does not include the installation or modification of an irrigation system?

Yes. If the project’s scope of landscape work does not include the installation or modification of an irrigation system, check the appropriate box on the DSA 1-L and provide the signed form at project submittal.

3. Do I need to submit a DSA 1-L if the landscape work is under the area thresholds defined in the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations?

Yes. If the landscape work is under the area thresholds defined in the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations, check the appropriate box on the DSA 1-L and provide the signed form at project submittal.

4. Do landscape-only projects need to be submitted to DSA?

Landscape-only projects are not required to be submitted to DSA; however, compliance to the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations is required.

5. For incremental projects with increment specific irrigated landscape in the scope of work, will each increment be required to submit form DSA 1-L?

No. There is only one DSA application number for incremental projects; therefore, there is only one form DSA 1-L required for the project. The initial submittal will require a Site Landscape Area Location Plan which shows all the irrigation landscape scope for all the increments. If there is a change of scope after the initial submittal, a revised form DSA 1-L will need to be submitted.

6. If an area of rehabilitated landscape is over 1,200 square feet but is a Special Landscape Area (SLA), does the Outdoor Water Use Regulations of CALGreen apply?

Yes. The Outdoor Water Use Regulations of CALGreen apply to the SLA. While SLA have an increased water allowance, they must be designed and installed with an evapotranspiration adjustment factor equal to or less than 1.00.

7. If a school district utilizes reclaimed water at the site, is a form DSA 1-L required?

Yes.  Modifications to the existing irrigation systems are required to be submitted to DSA, even if a site is in full compliance with the Model Water Efficiency Landscape Ordinance (MWELO).

8. Do the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations apply to landscape projects on property owned by the school district or community college but leased to a charter school?

Yes. Landscape projects on property owned by the school district or community college but leased to a charter school must comply with the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations.

9. Do I need to file a DSA form L-1 if the scope of work includes reconfiguration of ballfields on an existing irrigated sports area?

Landscape projects where the scope of work includes rehabilitated irrigation systems are required to meet the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations. Form DSA 1-L is required for projects at existing schools rehabilitating irrigation systems.

10. Are landscape maintenance projects such as reseeding/resodding of athletic fields and replacement of dead plants required to be submitted to DSA?

“Maintenance” work does not require submission to DSA provided the existing irrigation system is not being modified. 

11. Does “rehabilitated landscape area” mean that the existing landscape area is irrigated? Are there any situations where the existing landscape is not irrigated, but can be considered rehabilitated?

No. Replacing a current inefficient irrigation system with a more efficient irrigation system is critical to the definition of “rehabilitated.” An existing landscape area must have an inefficient irrigation system to be considered a landscape area that can be “rehabilitated.”

12. Can both new and rehabilitated landscape areas occur on an existing site?

Yes. “New landscape” is an area that never has had landscape irrigation installed, whereas “rehabilitated landscape” is an area that previously had landscape irrigation installed.

13. Is a campus exempt from the Minimum Rehabilitated Landscape Area (MRLA) requirement of the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations if there are no irrigated landscape areas on the entire campus, or all the existing landscape areas are compliant with MWELO?

Yes. Projects on a campus that have no irrigated landscape areas or are fully compliant with either the 2009 or 2015 MWELO would not be subject to the MRLA requirement. Check the appropriate box on the DSA 1-L and provide the signed form at project submittal.

14. Is a shade structure exempt from the Minimum Rehabilitated Landscape Area (MRLA) requirement?

Yes. Shade structures are exempt from the MRLA requirement.

15. Can the MRLA requirement be satisfied by using a combination of rehabilitated landscape areas and removal of existing irrigated landscape areas from service?

Yes. Show the location and the square footages on the Site Landscape Area Location Plan with a description of the type of rehabilitation or removal, and show the entire area of the previously irrigated landscaped area.

16. Can I apply the MRLA to an existing landscape area that is taken out of service by new paving, hardscape or a building? 

The MRLA may be applied to the existing landscape area being removed if it has an irrigation system. Any portions of the remaining existing landscape irrigation system that are modified must comply with the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations.

17. If the district wants to replace natural turf which has an existing irrigation system with synthetic turf which will only require water for cooling/cleaning, will the existing area be considered “out-of-service?”

While the 2015 MWELO does not specifically address synthetic (artificial) turf, the Department of Water Resources (DWR) considers it a nonliving area similar to a hardscape. Since artificial turf needs to be cooled and washed, the water utilized by a permanent watering system or hose bibs needs to be included in the district’s water budget. The area is not necessarily “out-of-service;” however, the area would be considered “rehabilitated” since it is more water efficient.

18. What is the district required to do for a site that has less landscape area needing rehabilitation than required by the MRLA?

If the existing irrigated landscape area needing rehabilitation is less that the MRLA required area, show on the Site Landscape Area Location Plan the areas to be rehabilitated and note in Part 3 of the DSA 1-L that there are no additional irrigated landscape areas on the existing site needing rehabilitation.

19. Is the MRLA required for buildings that are being replaced due to fire, water, or other related damage?

If the building has approximately the same square footage as the original building (measured at the footprint), then it would be a considered a “replacement-in-kind;” therefore, compliance with the MRLA requirement is not required. Form DSA 1-L will be required to be submitted if the project includes irrigated landscape work that exceeds the area thresholds of the CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations.

20. Does the MRLA apply to projects involving placement of relocatable buildings?

Yes. For projects involving placement of a relocatable building with a total area of 1,600 square feet or greater, the MRLA applies.

21. When is the application of the MRLA required for relocatable buildings installed on a new or existing site?

The following table lists the various options and whether the MRLA is required:

Type of Relocatable

Is the Minimum Rehabilitated Landscape Area (MRLA) Required?

New (N) Relocatable(s) to (N) site

Existing (E) Relocatable(s) to (N) site

Stockpile Relocatable(s) to (N) site

No. A new site must be fully compliant with the Outdoor Water Use Regulations of CALGreen.

(N) Relocatable(s) to (E) site

Stockpile Relocatable(s) to (E) site

(E) Relocatable(s) acquired from outside of
the district and installed on (E) site

Yes, if the total floor area of the relocatable is 1,600 square feet or greater.

(E) Relocatable(s) to (N) location on the same site

No, since the relocatable(s) will be moved within the same site, it is not additional building area for the site.

 

22. We are working with a school district that is planning to replace an existing 1,920 SF modular building with a new 2,800 SF modular building. Since we are only adding 880 SF of building area, and therefore below the 1,600 SF threshold, are we exempt from the MRLA requirement?

No. The 2,800 SF modular building is considered a “new building” and therefore the project is not exempt from the MRLA requirement.

23. What would trigger a DSA MWELO audit?

The CALGreen Outdoor Water Use Regulations require compliance with the provisions of MWELO. While DSA is relying on a trust-based self-certification of compliance by licensed design professionals, it also has a responsibility for accountability to the Department of Water Resources that the regulations are being followed.

DSA audits of landscape irrigation projects will be based on several criteria:

  • Randomly selected from projects with significant landscape irrigation work.
  • Observations of DSA inspectors and field engineers.
  • Citizen or district complaints of noncompliance.
  • Pattern or practice of systematic noncompliance on previous audits.

CONTACT DSA Headquarters

Headquarters Office

Division of the State Architect

1102 Q Street, Suite 5100
Sacramento, CA 95811

 

Reception (916) 445-8100
Fax (916) 445-3521

Headquarters Office Phone Roster (XLS)